I know, a lot of us are looking for different ways to lose weight. 

And sure, diet and exercise are the best.  Nothing can replace that. It might take a long time, but it's the way to go.  Eat less, eat better, move more, move faster.  You get it.  But if there's anything else I can do to move it along faster, I'm down with that.  As long as it's not like, some crazy pill or a diet that says you can only eat kale every other Thursday and and drink grape juice at noon.  You know, something practical.  Something easy to maintain.

Well, finally, science has caught up to me.  Apparently, according to Plymouth University studies reported by Fit Day, playing the classic game of Tetris can help you lose weight. Here's how it works.  Apparently, it's about the distraction.  Like, if you get a craving to snack on something and occupy your mind and hands instead, it'll pass quicker and go away for longer.

According to the research team, Tetris prevents cravings by replacing your addiction or desire with a distraction. Most craving episodes last for just a few minutes, during which time you can see what you want and how it will make you feel better. However, if you distract your mind during those few minutes, you will no longer feel the craving as strongly.  Those playing Tetris discovered that their cravings were up to 24 percent weaker than those that just watched a screen loading the game.

Who knew, my childhood 90's favorite would come in handy for something other than rearranging stuff in the closet.  I remember hours upon hours of playing Tetris on my old Nintendo Entertainment System.  It was one of maybe five games we had, and now, it could be helpful to adult me! Maybe I should find a game in the app store and get it on my phone.  Then when I'm feeling snacky, just a game or two of good old Tetris will help it pass faster.

What do you think? Will you try this method? Are you actively trying to lose weight right now?  What are you trying to accomplish?

Tetrisingly yours,
Behka

 

Goosebumps and other bodily reactions, explained