America is a free nation, and voting is an essential piece of that flexibility. Unlike different nations where despots and rulers settle on choices for the individuals, Americans get the right to choose who runs the nation and what laws ought to oversee nationals. In any case despite the fact that voting is a vital benefit, most Americans essentially don't vote, and some of their reasons may astound you. Here are seven normal reasons most Americans don't vote.

They think their vote won't count.


Numerous Americans don't vote in light of the fact that they think their vote doesn't count.  This is a typical reason that is established in the belief that the Electoral College picks the President, not the voters. As a general rule, the mainstream vote in each one state figures out which applicant the Electoral College picks for that state.  So your vote does count inside your state, and you ought to get out and exercise your entitlement to vote. Well, that's what I think, anyway.

They're just too busy.

Americans are often very occupied. Work, family, and other life commitments have a tendency to  get in the way of obligations like voting. Truth be told, individuals everywhere throughout the world have battled and died for you to have the right to vote. The minimum we can do is cut out a couple of minutes to go to a polling station and make our choice.

The process is confusing.


Voting enrollment can be befuddling, particularly for residents that have moved from district to district or from state to state. In any case, enrollment itself is effortless and takes minimally more than the presentation of ID.  So to make it easier, make it a point to upgrade your voter enrollment each time you move.
Apathy.

Americans are notorious for being unconcerned about legislative issues and voting by and large.  Numerous individuals dislike the factional wrangling and fighting of elections, and this is a legitimate concern. On the other hand, on the off chance that you are so aloof it would be impossible vote, you ought to make certain to hold your objections.  Isn't that the old phrase: if you don't vote, don't complain?
Lines are too long.
Voting lines can sometimes be long, and for busy people waiting in line is a horrible waste of time and energy. But in reality, voting lines are seldom long, even for high-profile presidential races. With the advent of new technology, voting is becoming easier and more efficient than ever before, and this allows voters to get in and out without having to wait in long lines. This excuse is becoming less and less relevant as time goes on.

Don't like the candidates.

Politicians are sometimes easy to dislike. Their flaws are often aired publicly for the entire world to see, and many people generally distrust politicians based on this information. But even if you don't particularly like any of the candidates, do you really know them? And should it matter whether you like them or not? Perhaps a politician's stance on issues important to you is more important than whether or not they are likeable. Even if it's choosing the lesser of two or more evils in your eyes, voting is still an important way for you to voice your opinion about the subjects you care about most.

Can't get to the polls.

Getting to polling locations can be a hassle, especially for the disabled, the sick, and people without transportation. In addition, voting becomes even more difficult for those citizens who are temporarily out of the country on vacation or business. But advocacy groups are making it much easier to get to the polls, even for those with special needs. In addition, absentee voting allows those people who are temporarily out of the country to cast their vote remotely. As a result, claiming that you can't get to the polls is not a very good excuse not to vote.

So I certainly hope that you did vote, or that you've decided to make a point to do it at the next election.   If you did, can you tell me what it is that keeps you voting?  If you didn't vote, I'm sure you have a reason not to... what was it?  No judgement, promise.  Take the latest Enquiring Minds survey and tell me if you voted, and why or why not?

Votingly yours,
Behka